Want to learn about managing creativity?

We’ve done many diverse things over the last couple of years with Banter and there’s always room for more. The good folks at the Irish Writers Centre approached us about collaborating on a project and the forthcoming Managing Creativity one-day course is a result of this.

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It’s intended to provide guidance, advice and a steer for writers, artists and arts managers for what to do once the actual work is finished and ready for the public. In many ways, finishing the work is just the start of the creative process and it can be just as challenging to distribute your work and ensure it receives the exposure and profile you’d like it to receive.

With the help of guest experts from a range of fields, this seminar will give participants a grounding in some of the key skills they’ll need to know. There will be four panels in total on the day covering topics such as setting up one-off events, getting your work into festivals, marketing, funding, finances and social media.

Managing Creativity will take place at the Irish Writers Centre, Parnell Square, Dublin 1 on Saturday February 27 and there’s more information here.

 

Howya: the evolution of the Dublin accent (127, Jan 2016)

Just what does Dublin sound sound like? In 2015, there’s a wide range of accents classifiable as the Dublin accent depending on which part of the city or county you happen to be in. We know the ones which are the stuff of caricature and mimic but there’s more to this than just Ross O’Carroll Kelly and Love/Hate.

Over the years, the Dublin accent – as well as the city’s slang, language and lexicon – has changed and morphed numerous times. Be it on the streets, the stage or the screen, what passes for what we hear around us in the the city in 2015 is a lot different to what it was 20 years ago or even in the rare aul’ times.

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For this Banter, we’re looking at how these changes happened, the influences on accents, the unique confluence of events which have made Dublin accents turn out the way they have, the effect of various geographical divides on the dialect and just what the city might sound like a few years from now.

The Banter panel: Jenny Keogh (photographer, film-maker and director of Story Bud?), Aoife Dooley (Dublin Hun creator and illustrator) and Derek O’Connor (writer and film-maker)

 

The small print: Banter on the evolution of the Dublin accent takes place at MVP (Upper Clanbrassil St., Dublin) on Wednesday January 27). Doors open at
6pm and we’ll kick off at 6.30pm. Tickets are available here