100 years of #ImmodestWomen (193, June 2018)

It’s 100 years since Irish women first received the right to vote. While the intervening century has seen many other wins and advances across different parts of Irish life, there’s still a lengthy to-do list to be enacted to bring about real equality for women in our society.

As part of the Vótáil 100 series of events to mark a centenary of women’s suffrage and representation in the Houses of the Oireachtas, this special Banter discussion curated by the Irish Research Council will examine where the road goes from here and the challenges which lie ahead.

What are the priorities on that to-do list and why? Are future changes the preserve of parliamentarians or will they come about through sustained people pressure? What can we learn from the experiences of other countries? Indeed, what can we learn from our experiences at the ballot boxes here in 2015 and 2018? And will the day a woman Taoiseach steps up in Dáil Éireann be the day to say the job’s done?

The details: this Banter event will take place at The Liquor Rooms (Wellington Quay, Dublin 2) on Thursday June 28 with Ailbhe Smith (Co-Director of Together For Yes and Convenor of Coalition to Repeal the 8th Amendment), Sarah Robinson (UCC School of Psychology PhD candidate and current Irish Research Council awardee) and guests. Doors open at 6pm and the discussion begins at 6.30pm. Tickets are now available here and all proceeds go to Women’s Aid.

About the Irish Research Council: the Council was formed in 2012, is an associated agency of the Department of Education and Skills, and operates under the aegis of the Higher Education Authority. The core function of the Council is to support excellent frontier research across all disciplines and all career stages. The Council promotes diverse career opportunities for researchers by partnering with enterprise and employers. The Council also has a particular role in supporting research with a societal focus, and has established partnerships across government and civic society. Further information: http://www.research.ie, @IrishResearch, #LoveIrishResearch

A conversation with Bell X1’s Paul Noonan (195, June 2018)

It is 20 years since Bell X1 came our way. As they note on their website, lots can happen in 20 years. There has been a rake of great albums in this time from the band – for our money, “Arms”, the “difficult seventh album” from 2016, stands tallest – and they continue to forge onwards and upwards.

Given that the band are marking 20 years of Bell X1 with a run of sold-out shows up and down the country, we thought it would be a good idea to bring lead singer Paul Noonan to Banter for a discussion about life, work, music and all the rest of it as part of the Wellington Weekender at the Workman’s Club on Saturday June 30.

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Spend the afternoon with us in the Workman’s Club venue bar and hear some yarns, anecdotes, asides and insights.

Doors open at 2.30pm and the conversation kicks off at 3pm-ish. Tickets are available here with a €2 charitable donation to Aware.

The art of darkness (194, June 2018)

After a very successful outing at Dublin Castle in April, we’re back in the big gaff in the heart of the capital on Saturday June 30 for another event.

As the hugely successful Coming Home: Art and the Great Hunger exhibition draws to a close at Dublin Castle, this discussion will look at the dark art around tragedies and disaster. How does art capture the horror of these situations? Is the role of the artist to document what has occurred or produce another perspective? How does the work impact not just on the audience but the artist as well?

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The panel: Niamh O’Sullivan (Professor Emeritus at National College of Art and Design and curator of Coming Home: Art and the Great Hunger), Gillian O’Brien (historian at Liverpool John Moores University and dark tourism specialist), Brian Maguire (artist whose work is featured in the exhibition) and guests

The details: this discussion will take place at Dublin Castle on Saturday June 30 at noon. Tickets are now available here.

The weight of history: Dublin Castle then and now (192, April 2018)

What does Dublin Castle mean to you? Is it the big gaff in the middle of the city that houses tribunals and the like? Is it somewhere with a history which you don’t really know that much about? Is it the place you recommend to visiting pals but which you never visits yourself?

As the Making Majesty exhibition comes to a close, it’s an apt time to consider Dublin Castle’s position in terms of history, politics and society. While Dublin Castle itself is often viewed as a bastion of British rule for hundreds of years, the exhibition focused on the motivations behind the building’s grand regal designs, something we often forget about today.

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Given the current focus on independence-related events from a century ago and Brexit-related events right now, this Banter discussion will look at the responsiblities and challenges of dealing with Dublin Castle’s past in 2018.

The panel: Martina Devlin (writer and columnist at The Irish Independent), John Gibney (Royal Irish Academy historian and author of Dublin – A New Illustrated History), Diarmaid Ferriter (Professor of Modern Irish History at UCD, author, broadcaster and columnist at The Irish Times) and Myles Campbell (Making Majesty exhibition curator).

The details: Banter on Dublin Castle then and now will take place at the State Apartments, Dublin Castle on Saturday April 21st at 3pm. Tickets are available here.

 

The culture of sexual harassment (191, March 2018)

In the wake of Weinstein, Nassar, #MeToo and much more, society is scrutinising sexual harassment in the workplace like never before. Whereas slow erosions on inequalities are often the norm, this movement gained much momentum suddenly and demanded a sea-change.

What we wants to know is: how did we find ourselves here? How can this fervour be sustained? And what can be done to crystalise this zero tolerance into something that works for workers, but also attains the buy-in of business?

Joining us to discuss these issues and more will be Noeline Blackwell (Chief Executive of the Dublin Rape Crisis Centre), Ellen Coyne (senior Ireland journalist with The Times Ireland Edition), Simone George (consultant litigator and advocate) and Caroline McCamley (business consultant and executive director of Ampersand)

The Culture of Sexual Harassment

The details: A Culture of Sexual Harassment: From #MeToo to What Now? takes place at The Liquor Rooms, Wellington Quay, Dublin 2 on Wednesday March 28. Doors open at 6pm and we start at 6.30pm. Tickets are available here and all proceeds from the event go to Women’s Aid.